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Five droolworthy Maltese treats you MUST try this Easter
Good luck keeping up that diet!

Kim Vella

Maltese celebrations are defined by three things – family, alcohol, and good food. 

Despite the country’s small size, Malta has still managed to build up a rich (and incredibly tasty) culinary heritage, with traditional delicacies surrounding pretty much every national holiday. 

So, whether you're a proud local celebrating Easter with family or a foreigner experiencing this feast for the first time on the islands, tasting our traditional treats is key to gaining a better understanding of Maltese culture.  

Here are five of the most tantalising Maltese treats you must try this Easter 

1. Figolla

The first snack on the list needs no introduction figolli are a highlight of Malta’s Easter period and an essential part of the country’s culinary heritage. 

This sweet snack is comprised of a simple biscuit base made from butter, flour, sugar, vanilla, eggs, lemon, and water, which is then stuffed with a signature marzipan-like filling.  

Figolli come in various shapes and sizes, such as ducks, eggs, hearts, and guitars.  

It is said that this sweets origins date back to Pagan times in Sicily, where the word figolla is believed to derive from the Italian word 'figulina' (‘figure' in English) 

2. Kwarezimal

Popular during the 40 days of lent, Kwarezimal is a sweet treat in the form of a chewy biscuit topped with crunchy roasted nuts. 

This treat was created by the Knights of Malta specifically to be eaten during this period, hence why the original recipe for kwarezimal involved no animal products. 

Interestingly, this means that the delicacy is actually vegan, containing only flour, sugar, orange rind, and ground almonds.  

3. Karamelli tal-harrub

If you intend on indulging in this Eastertime treat, we highly recommend booking a dentist’s appointment in advance. 

Karamelli tal-harrub are small, brown, sweet squares that look like broken glass. These sweet treats are made exclusively from carob syrup and contain no animal products whatsoever.  

4. Sfineg

This traditional fluffy-yet-crunchy fritter is testament to the fact that you don’t need expensive ingredients to make delicious food! 

Sfineg are made with a handful of very humble ingredients –  flour, yeast, salt, water, oil, and anchovies. These are mixed up, portioned into small balls, and fried in hot oil. 

These bite-sized fritters are particularly popular during Good Friday, when Christians refrain from eating meat. 

If you’re not a big fan of anchovies, worry not, you can get your hands on countless versions of sfineg with different fillings. 

5. Qaghqa tal-Appostli

The qaghqa tal-appostli is easily one of the best types of bread Malta has to offer. 

This delectable ring-shaped carb boasts a crunchy exterior and a soft interior. It is also topped with sesame seeds and a couple of almonds. 

If you ask us, the qaghqa tal-appostli is best enjoyed fresh with a knob of salty butter.  

Honourable mention: Zeppoli  

Zeppoli aren’t Easter treats per se, as they’re traditionally eaten on St Joseph’s Day (hence the name). However, seeing as how this feast often coincides with lent, they have become pretty synonymous with Eastertime in Malta. 

This sweet treat is made by filling a deep-fried dough ball with either custard, ricotta, or pastry cream. The ball is then topped with powdered sugar for good measure. 

Zeppoli, or similar renditions of the sweet, can be found all over the world.  

Which of these is your go-to Easter snack? 

 

Main image: Instagram/ apronandwhisk 

Main image: Instagram/ aricookstheworld  

Main image: Instagram/ apronandwhisk 

15th April 2022


Kim Vella
Written by
Kim Vella
A highly curious explorer always looking to find her next adventure. Kim loves sharing her experiences and what's happening on the Maltese Islands. When not writing, you’ll probably find her playing around with some clay or somewhere surrounded by trees. She's always up for listening to people's stories about anything to do with nature, a passion project or issue you feel needs tending to.

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