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Did you know? Touching submerged ropes out at sea can land you with a nasty sting
Keep your distance!

Francesca Xuereb

Well-known marine biologist and associate professor Alan Deidun took to Facebook group ‘Jellyfish in Gozo’ to warn readers against touching ‘submerged ropes or parts of a float’ when swimming in Maltese waters.

This is because these items are often home to ‘stinging hyroids’ – marine creatures that belong to the same group as Cnidaria jellyfish – which are venomous.

If one touches these creatures, pictured below, one can expect skin rashes to emerge – so keep your distance next time you’re at the beach!

Credit: Jellyfish in Gozo (via Alan Deidun)/Facebook

Should you get stung by one of these, don’t rinse the affected area with freshwater. If you’ve got some on hand, apply some vinegar or bicarbonate of soda to the area.

Along with being an Associate Professor at the University of Malta, Alan Deidun is the Director of Malta’s Training Centre within the International Ocean Institute, as well as a Fellow of London’s Royal Society of Biology.

Alain has published over 120 peer-reviewed papers and has coordinated numerous environmental studies and projects.

Have you seen any of these before?

 Jellyfish in Gozo (via Alan Deidun)/Facebook

18th August 2022


Francesca Xuereb
Written by
Francesca Xuereb
Equipped with puns and references galore, Francesca is a writer who's interested in almost anything and everything. When not creating or consuming memes, she can probably be found listening to music, playing video games, reading, and going down endless Internet rabbit holes.

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