Attractions
Four unconventional sites you MUST visit this summer in Malta
Thought you’ve experienced all our islands have to offer? Think again!

Kim Vella

The sun will soon be shining, the sea sparkling, and the crowds gathering.

Tired of the bustling beaches and visiting the same areas over and over again? Here are four lesser-known places that are a must visit for this summer:

 1. Il-Hofra L-Kbira

One of the best ways you can experience the island is by taking a dip in its crystal blue waters (preferably on a quaint, quiet, and unspoilt beach). This sometimes means going the extra mile and visiting a lesser-known site.

Whilst the Northern area of Malta is synonymous with gorgeous bays, the South has also got its fair share of beautiful coastal spots.

Found in Marsaxlokk, the beach at Il-Hofra l-Kbira is almost completely hidden below a cliff. This gorgeous area treats visitors to shallow, warm waters as well as a cave offering beach-goers some well-deserved shade.

Il-Hofra l-Kbira is also super close to Marsaxlokk’s insanely popular swimming spot – St Peter’s Pool.

 2. Il-Maqluba Sinkhole

If soaking up the sun isn’t your thing, then a long, scenic trek might be just what you’re looking for!

Il-Maqluba Sinkhole (maqluba roughly translates to ‘upside down’) is a 165-foot wide, 50-foot deep sinkhole in Qrendi – a quaint town located close to the Mnajdra and Hagar Qim temples.

This natural wonder is believed to have formed in the 13th century and is now home to rare plants and fungi.

 3. Ghar is-Slaleb

Got an adventurous streak? Then we know just the place for you! This mysterious medieval cave in Qormi has been extensively explored by local daredevil Pierre Farrugia, who’s set on showing off all the lesser-known sites the island has to offer.

Known as Ghar tas-Slaleb and Ghar Hanzir, this cave is hidden behind vegetation deep inside Qormi’s idyllic Wied il-Kbir.

This spot is believed to have served as a church for troglodytes back in the Middle Ages.

One more thing – the cave is actually far larger than it initially lets on, spanning around two-and-a-half metres in height and five metres in width.

4. The Secret Passage at St Gregory’s Church

Despite its innocent façade, St Gregory’s Church in Zejtun is home to the creepiest site on this list.

The church’s thick walls actually contain a hidden passageway filled to the brim with human bones. Yes, you read that right, human bones.

The passageway had been hidden for centuries before it was discovered in the 1960s. The skeletons inside are believed to date back to the 1600s.

Why travel to the Paris catacombs when you’ve got St Gregory’s Church a stone’s throw away?

Main image: @pati.bugalska / Instagram, @visitmaltait / Instagram


Kim Vella
Written by
Kim Vella
A highly curious explorer always looking to find her next adventure. Kim loves sharing her experiences and what's happening on the Maltese Islands. When not writing, you’ll probably find her playing around with some clay or somewhere surrounded by trees. She's always up for listening to people's stories about anything to do with nature, a passion project or issue you feel needs tending to.

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